Sunday

March 31

IF a person could be persuaded of this principle as he ought, that we are all originally descended from God, and that He is the Father of gods and men, I conceive he never would think meanly or degenerately concerning himself.

EPICTETUS. DISCOURSES. Book i. §3. ¶1.

UPON all occasions we ought to have these maxims ready at hand:

Conduct me, Jove, and thou, O Destiny,
Wherever your decrees have fixed my station.
I follow cheerfully; and, did I not.
Wicked and wretched, I must follow still.

Whoe'er yields properly to Fate, is deemed
Wise among men, and knows the laws of heaven.

And this third:
"O Crito, if it thus pleases the gods, thus let it be. Anytus and Meletus may kill me indeed, but hurt me they cannot."


EPICTETUS. MANUAL. 52.

1 comment:

  1. Quote: "Whoe'er yields properly to Fate, is deemed Wise among men, and knows the laws of heaven."

    The key to yielding PROPERLY to Fate, is to understand clearly what has been fated for us, that is to say, what things are not under our control, and what has been left to us to choose. It is not merely calmly accepting all that comes to us, but accepting that after all that we can do, the ends are not up to us. Our moral choices, deliberating thoughts and virtuous actions we own, as well as their opposites. The events and results rest in the hands of Fate.

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