Tuesday

July 15

MAN is made for fidelity, and whoever subverts this subverts the peculiar property of man.

EPICTETUS. DISCOURSES. Book ii. §4. ¶1

IT is good to know your own qualifications and powers; that, where you are not qualified, you may be quiet, and not angry that others have the advantage of you in such things.

EPICTETUS. DISCOURSES. Book ii. §6. ¶1

WHAT is the first business of one who studies philosophy? To part with self-conceit. For it is impossible for anyone to begin to learn what he hath a conceit that he already knows.

EPICTETUS. DISCOURSES. Book ii. §17. ¶1

THERE is nothing more shameful than perfidious friendship. Above all things, that must be avoided. However, true goodness, simplicity, and kindness cannot so be hidden, but that as we have already said in the very eyes and countenance they will show themselves.

MARCUS AURELIUS. MEDITATIONS. Book xi. 7.

4 comments:

  1. True friends will be known through their faces and actions. :)

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  2. I find there is a trend in this modern age to devalue others accomplishments and talents. We have subscribed to this doctrine of "mediocrity and equality" to the point were there is a homogeneous mess of average. The individuals that stand out are envied and, in some cases, encouraged to conform to the norms of society so that "others" will not feel "bad". We need to focus on finding the aspects of life that people excel at and encourage them to hone those skills to a fine edge, rather than focusing on their limitations in other areas. This change in focus will allow everyone to excel at their talents and be the best that they personally can be.

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  3. Herein is wisdom. Do not revel in your ignorance, nor enshrine your opinion above knowledge. First acknowledge your inexperience, then be silent, observe, listen, and learn. Then you will have the benefit of two lifetimes, yours and your teachers.

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