Saturday

January 3


BETIMES in the morning say to thyself: This day I shall have to do with an idle curious man, with an unthankful man, a railer, a crafty, false, or an envious man; an unsociable uncharitable man. All these ill qualities have happened unto them, through ignorance of that which is truly good and truly bad. But I that understand the nature of that which is good, that it only is to be desired, and of that which is bad, that it only is truly odious and shameful: who know moreover, that this transgressor, whosoever he be, is my kinsman, not by the same blood and seed, but by participation of the same reason, and of the same divine particle; How can I either be hurt by any of those, since it is not in their power to make me incur anything that is truly reproachful? or angry, and ill affected towards him, who by nature is so near unto me? for we are all born to be fellow-workers, as the feet, the hands, and the eye-lids; as the rows of the upper and under teeth: for such therefore to be in opposition, is against nature; and what is it to chafe at, and to be averse from, but to be in opposition?

MARCUS AURELIUS. MEDITATIONS. Book i. 15.

4 comments:

  1. One of my favorite quotes from the Emperor.

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  2. I love "for we are all born to be fellow-workers." That is a right slap in the face of the popular stoic in a cave aspect.

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  3. We can only be affected by those we allow to have an effect on us. Virtue is all and we are all working towards virtuous ends together. That is what life is all about.

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  4. We are all born to be fellow-workers, as the feet, the hands, and the eye-lids; as the rows of the upper and lower teeth. To constantly live in opposition to each other, to strive and fight and steal, is against nature. We must work together if we are to do more than merely survive, if we want to flourish. - Lessons from Marcus Aurelius

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