Monday

December 14

I MUST die: and must I die groaning too? — Be fettered. Must it be lamenting too? — Exiled. And what hinders me, then, but that I may go smiling, and cheerful, and serene ? — "Betray a secret." — I will not betray it; for this is in my own power. — "Then I will fetter you." — What do you say, man? Fetter me? You will fetter my leg; but not Jupiter himself can get the better of my choice. "I will throwyou into prison: I will behead that paltry body of yours." Did I ever tell you, that I alone had a head not liable to be cut off? — These things ought philosophers to study; these ought they daily to write; and in these to exercise themselves.

EPICTETUS. DISCOURSES. Book i. §1. ¶6.

I WILL dine first, and when the hour comes, then I will die. How? As becomes one who restores what is not his own.

EPICTETUS. DISCOURSES. Book i. §1. ¶7.

4 comments:

  1. I really like the statement that this Stoic principle, (along with the others), should be part of a daily cycle of writing and reflection. It is hidden in these small passages.

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  2. This is the first lesson of a Stoic that Death is not to be feared but to be accepted. Once you accept that death is a part of life then you are free to live fully. The only thing of real importance is your choice and that can only be controlled by yourself. Everything else in this life is just details, many of them are wonderful details, but just details.

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  3. "This is the first lesson of a Stoic that Death is not to be feared but to be accepted. Once you accept that death is a part of life then you are free to live fully."
    Very well put!

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  4. Another year has passed and still the challenge is to decide what choices take precedence. This choice is what a lifetime is made of. I shall continue on in the footprints of those who have come before, striving to make the choices that must be made, striving to live life to its fullest potential.

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