Sunday

December 6

FOR a man to be proud and high conceited, that he is not proud and high conceited, is of all kinds of pride and presumption the most intolerable.

MARCUS AURELIUS. MEDITATIONS. Book xii. 20.

WHEN you have brought yourself to supply the necessities of your body at a small price, do not pique yourself upon it; nor, if you drink water, be saying upon every occasion, "I drink water." But first consider how much more sparing and patient of hardship the poor are than we. But if at any time you would inure yourself by exercise to labour, and bearing hard trials, do it for your own sake, and not for the world ; do not grasp statues, but, when you are violently thirsty, take a little cold water in your mouth, and spurt it out and tell nobody.

EPICTETUS. MANUAL. 47.

IF you would be well spoken of, learn to speak well of others. And, when you have learned to speak well of them, endeavour likewise to do well to them ; and thus you will reap the fruit of being well spoken of by them.

EPICTETUS. FRAGMENTS. 6.


3 comments:

  1. Each of these seems to build on the previous saying. A well put together selection actually. I like the idea of quietly doing good, and the concepts surrounding true humility.

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  2. If you would prepare yourself for difficulties through practice and exercise, and learn to bear the hardships and trials of life, do it for your own sake, and not for the world. Do not seek the praise and glory of the world for doing that which the poorest are forced to do by necessity. - Lessons from Epictetus

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  3. To speak well of others first and foremost, not to be constantly wondering if anyone is hearing and commending your for the good you do/speak etc. What freedom of action there is in life when you are more concerned about the reputation of others than oneself.

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