Saturday

August 6

TO desire things impossible is the part of a mad man. But it is a thing impossible, that wicked man should not commit some such things. Neither doth anything happen to any man, which in the ordinary course of nature as natural unto him doth not happen. Again, the same things happen unto others also. And truly, if either he that is ignorant that such a thing hath happened unto him, or he that is ambitious to be commended for his magnanimity, can be patient, and is not grieved: is it not a grievous thing, that either ignorance, or a vain desire to please and to be commended, should be more powerful and effectual than true prudence? As for the things themselves, they touch not the soul, neither can they have any access unto it: neither can they of themselves any ways either affect it, or move it.

MARCUS AURELIUS. MEDITATIONS. Book vi. 16.

4 comments:

  1. We can only do our best to not commit evil and wickedness. We are human and fallible and we will fail. The trick is that we try our best to make the best choices and govern ourselves according to our "best" selves.

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  2. It is important to remember that our lives are just as long and just as troubling as many others. We ought to approach each day with an acceptance of the past, and clear vision of the present, and courage and wisdom to change our futures where we can.

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  3. We are human and are not perfect. We need to accept our failings and move forward. We also need to act and move forward with true intentions to act virtuously in the knowledge that we have. Vanity or ignorance are not excuses for vicious conduct.

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  4. Why do we plead ignorance of the causes and potential effects of our actions? Why, instead of choosing the right way, do we succumb to the desires of others? Is their praise worth more than our freedom to do what is right?

    We do so to absolve ourselves of the responsibility of acting in accordance with sound judgement. We would rather not know, or follow the whims of the crowd, than strike out on our own, having rationally sought out the best course of action, and courageously set foot on an untrodden path.

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