Sunday

July 31

WHAT is it to be reviled, for instance? Stand by a stone and revile it; and what will you get? If you, therefore, would hear like a stone, what would your reviler be the better? But if the reviler hath the weakness of the reviled for an advantage ground, then he carries his point. "Strip him." — "What do you mean by him?" "Take my clothes; strip off them if you will." I have put an affront upon you." — "Much good may it do you."

EPICTETUS. DISCOURSES. Book i. §25. ¶3

WHAT is it then that should be dear unto us ? to hear a clattering noise? if not that, then neither to be applauded by the tongues of men. For the praises of many tongues, is in effect no better, than the clattering of so many tongues. If then neither applause, what is there remaining that should be dear unto thee? This I think: that in all thy motions and actions thou be moved, and restrained according to thine own true natural constitution and construction only.

MARCUS AURELIUS. MEDITATIONS. Book vi. 15.

Saturday

July 30

IF you are hasty, man, let it be your exercise to bear ill language patiently ; and when you are affronted, not to be angry.

EPICTETUS. DISCOURSES. Book iii. §12. ¶2

BUT if this be done for mere ostentation, it belongs to one who looks out and hunts for something external, and seeks for spectators to exclaim, "What a great man!" Hence Apollonius said well: “If you have a mind to exercise yourself for your own benefit, when you are choking with heat, take a little cold water in your mouth and spit it out again, and tell nobody."

EPICTETUS. DISCOURSES. Book iii. §12. ¶5

AN angry countenance is much against nature, and it is oftentimes the proper countenance of them that are at the point of death.

MARCUS AURELIUS. MEDITATIONS. Book vii. 18.

Friday

July 29

WHEN thou art offended with any man's transgression, presently reflect upon thyself, and consider what thou thyself art guilty of in the same kind.

MARCUS AURELIUS. MEDITATIONS. Book x. 30.

WHENSOEVER any man doth trespass against thee, presently consider with thyself what it was that he did suppose to be good, what to be evil, when he did trespass. For this when thou knowest, thou wilt pity him; thou wilt have no occasion either to wonder, or to be angry. For either thou thyself dost yet live in that error and ignorance, as that thou dost suppose either that very thing that he doth, or some other like worldly thing, to be good; and so thou art bound to pardon him if he have done that which thou in the like case wouldst have done thyself. Or if so be that thou dost not any more suppose the same things to be good or evil, that he doth; how canst thou but be gentle unto him that is in an error?

MARCUS AURELIUS. MEDITATIONS. Book vii. 19.

Thursday

July 28

WHEN any shall either impeach thee with false accusations, or hatefully reproach thee, or shall use any such carriage towards thee, get thee presently to their minds and understandings, and look in them, and behold what manner of men they be. Thou shalt see that there is no such occasion why it should trouble thee, what such as they think of thee. Yet must thou love them still, for by nature they are thy friends.

MARCUS AURELIUS. MEDITATIONS. Book ix. 25.

IF it were thine act and in thine own power, why wouldst thou do it ? If it were not, whom dost thou accuse? the atoms, or the gods? For to do either, is the part of a madman. Thou must therefore blame nobody, but if it be in thy power, redress what is amiss; if it be not, to what end dost thou complain?

MARCUS AURELIUS. MEDITATIONS. Book viii. 15.